Big Life Foundation
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Your donation, regardless of size, makes a meaningful impact on the ground.
Each year, Big Life Foundation must raise millions of dollars to fulfill our annual budget, which enables the protection of wildlife and wild lands in East Africa. Here are some examples of the types of program expenses your gift could help support:

$10 a Kenyan child’s field conservation education experience in Amboseli National Park.

$15 food and veterinary supplies for the tracker dogs for a day.. 

$25 fuel for one vehicle for a day’s worth of ranger patrols.

$40 a high-powered flashlight to be used during night patrols.

$50 a one-night supply of thunder flashes to deter crop-raiding elephants and livestock-predating lions.

$65 a pair of military-grade boots for a ranger.

$75 a CamelBak or other personal hydration system for a ranger.

$100 salary, rations, and insurance for a PCF Verification Officer for a week.

$140 a starter pack of vegetable seeds, tree seedlings, and tools for a school farm.

$175 a camera trap for remote monitoring of rhinos and potential poachers, including one camera with a camouflage security box and lock.

$200 a standard ranger’s salary for one month.

$220 a tent for rangers’ use during remote mobile patrols.

$250 protection of lions from retaliatory killing after a livestock depredation.

$270 – two weeks of training for a local farmer on environmentally-friendly farming methods and permaculture techniques.

$300 an hour of aerial surveillance to monitor wildlife and look for illegal activity.

$300 – a smartphone for ranger data collection.

$415 a GPS unit used by rangers in the field while recording field data.

$500 food rations for a ranger unit for one month.

$625 one ranger’s fees to attend Amboseli Conservation Academy, funded and operated by Big Life, for a 3-week advanced ranger training course.

$850 the logistical costs of tracking prosecutions in court for a month.

$1,000 a long-distance handheld radio, enabling ranger communication while on patrol.

$5,700 a ranger’s fees to attend basic training at the Kenya Wildlife Service Training Academy.

$5,800 a month’s maintenance of an anti-poaching/trafficking informer network.

$12,000 1 km of protective fence, to deter crop-raiding by and retaliation against elephants.

$50,000 – construction and operation of a new ranger outpost for one year.

$70,000 a new, fully-equipped anti-poaching Land Cruiser for our rangers.

$150,000 annual land lease fees, to help secure contiguous wildlife habitat and corridors.

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80% to 100% of Proceeds go to Big Life
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