Meet the rangers

Below are some of the rangers whose work you will be supporting when you join our Ranger Club.

Hover your mouse over each ranger's face to find out how long he has been a ranger. For our long-serving rangers, a fist represents 10 years. Click through to get to know them better.

Big Life Dog Unit

Our dog unit operates out of a small base in the beautiful Chyulu Hills. This is a small unit, led by one of our most trusted rangers, Mutinda—a converted poacher. The small number of men means that the unit can be rapidly deployed to poaching incidents anywhere in the ecosystem by vehicle or aircraft. Our sniffer dog, Didi, was rescued from a shelter as a puppy, and she has happily dedicated her life to tracking down poachers! 

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I am Nicholas Mutinda Ndivo

Age: 49

Home: Makindu

I support: 14 people

Years of education: 5

Why I became a ranger:

“I was once a very bad poacher and was caught by Richard Bonham and Big Life rangers. Richard sat with me and convinced me to become a ranger instead, and now I am happy because I can support my family by protecting animals rather than killing them.”

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I am Joel Matasha Yampat

Age: 45

Home: Mbirikani

I support: 7 people

Education: None

Why I became a ranger: 

"I realized how important wildlife was to the community and it helps me support my family, so I wanted to stop the killing."

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I am Musa Ole Detela

Age: 40

Home: Ilchalai

I support: 10 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“I could be a ranger even though I have no education, and I used to admire the rangers I saw and wanted to become one too.”

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I am Leiyian Shakoya Korinko

Age: 26

Home: Ilmarba

I support: 9 people

Years of education: 8 years

Why I became a ranger:

“I wanted to help wildlife so they can become many and to tell the community about the benefits of wildlfe and how it can be more than having cows.”

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I am SIMON SOLITE OLE NTELEKA

Age: 44

Home: Isinet

I support: 9 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“I like animals and want to protect them, the income also allows me to support my family.”

Lenkiloriti Outpost

Lenkiloriti is tucked into the foothills of the volcanic Chyulu range, bordering the Chyulu Hills National Park. This is a wild area, and any human activity is usually bad news. The rangers from this outpost spend most of their time on daytime foot patrols, looking for signs of poachers. The endangered black rhino population of the Chyulu Hills NP live in the area that these men protect. Our rangers' presence is critical for the survival of these animals.

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I am Kanai Kitipa Korroet

Age: 56

Home: Namelok

I support: 7 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“To work near my home community in a job that is secure, and allows me to support and educate my family to secure their future.”

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I am Joel Meeli Koyan

Age: 25

Home: Lemasusu

I support: 10 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“To help support his family and help his community.”

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I am James Ayaki Sumare

Age: 20

Home: Namelok

I support: 11 people

Years of education: 11 years

Why I became a ranger:

“I wanted to work somewhere nice with no noise where I can help animals that are threatened with extinction. I wanted to help stop the killing.”

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I am Lemaron Solonka

Age: 29

Home: Lemasusu

I support: 30 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“It is difficult to get a job with no education, but rangers don't need a school education.”

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I am Sakimba Sharkarda

Age: 43

Home: Lemasusu

I support: 28 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“I don't have an education, but I will learn skills being a ranger and helping animals will benefit my children and my children's children.”

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I am Munkesia Ole Kediene

Age: 46

Home: Olbili

I support: 30 people

Years of education: None

Why I became a ranger:

“I recognized the benefits of wildlife, that the animals bring guests that give money to help feed and educate children and advance the community.”